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Events

Sam Baron (UWA): What in the World is Metaphysics?

Philosophy - events - Sun, 2016-10-09 14:27
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Thu, 24/11/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Despite practicing metaphysics for the better part of a decade, I have no idea what it is. A cursory look at the literature reveals at least a dozen distinct accounts of the nature of metaphysics as a discipline. That's horrifying. In this paper, I attempt four things. First, I lay out three desiderata for shaping the discussion of what metaphysics is: (i) Appropriateness; (ii) Neutrality and (iii) Uniqueness. Second, I provide a taxonomy of meta-metaphysical positions regarding the nature of metaphysics itself.

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Kristie Miller (USyd) & James Norton (USyd): Grounding: it’s (probably) all in the head

Philosophy - events - Sun, 2016-10-09 14:26
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Thu, 17/11/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

In this paper we provide a psychological explanation for ‘grounding observations’—observations that are thought to provide evidence that there exists a relation of ground. Our explanation does not appeal to the presence of any such relation. Instead, it appeals to certain evolved cognitive mechanisms, along with the traditional modal relations of supervenience, necessitation and entailment.

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Richard Menary (Macquarie): Did Social Cognition Culturally Evolve?

Philosophy - events - Sun, 2016-10-09 14:25
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Thu, 10/11/2016 - 16:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

For some time now, the dominant theory of social cognition has been  mindreading (or mentalizing); the ability to attribute mental states in order to explain and predict behaviour. The current state of the art is implicit mindreading: an inherited capacity for automatic and fast mentalizing. However, implicit mindreading has come under pressure, for example the experiments that are supposed to support infant mindreading are problematic and alternative explanations are available. Cecelia Heyes has been at the forefront of these critiques.

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Leif Wenar (LSE)

Philosophy - events - Sun, 2016-10-09 14:23
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Thu, 03/11/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Murder, Sex and the Death Penalty in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada: A Preliminary Inquiry

School of History - events - Thu, 2016-10-06 10:30
Date and time:  Wed, 12/10/2016 - 16:15 - 17:30 Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU

Toronto Globe and Mail, 15 March 1927, report of the judgement of the Court of Appeal of Ontario that set aside the death sentence imposed on William McCathern for rape.

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Categories: Events, School of History

Preliminary analysis of the Indigenous sample of the 2015 Northern Territory Gambling Prevalence and Wellbeing Survey

CAEPR events - Wed, 2016-10-05 17:49
19 Oct 16 Matthew Stevens Menzies School of Health Research Darwin

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

Public Value and Aboriginal Social Enterprise in the Kimberley Region, Western Australia

CAEPR events - Wed, 2016-10-05 17:38
12 Oct 16 Patrick Sullivan Scott Gorringe Janet Hunt Julie Lahn

This seminar explores the themes of a research project into reciprocal accountability and the public value created by Aboriginal organisations in the Kimberley. The concept of public value was advanced by Moore in the early 1980s when neo-liberal public management first threatened to dominate the administrative apparatus of the Anglophone states. It has been refined since, and offers an alternative, now that neo-liberal public management faces widespread public disillusion.

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

Fifty years of deaths in Australia, 1856–1906: a view from the civil registers

Demography - events - Wed, 2016-10-05 12:40
Date and time:  Fri, 4th Nov 2016 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm Presenter:  Michael de Looper Location:  Seminar Room A, Coombs Building #9

Analyses of mortality data in Australia generally do not examine the period before the formation of the Commonwealth Bureau of Census and Statistics in 1905. Yet detailed information on death and its causes is available from the commencement of civil registration in the colonies in the mid-nineteenth century, beginning with Tasmania as far back as 1838. By 1856, all colonies had enacted legislation for the compulsory registration of births, deaths and marriages.

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The Defeat of Conscription: A Centennial Retrospective

School of History - events - Tue, 2016-10-04 15:15
Date and time:  Sat, 29/10/2016 - 13:00 - 17:30 Venue:  Hedley Bull Centre (Building 130), Room 2, The Australian National University   Australian Society for the Study of Labour History in partnership with the School of History, The Australian National University

1.00-1.10:

Frank Bongiorno - Welcome: Why does the centenary of the conscription crisis matter?

1.10-3.00:                       

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Categories: Events, School of History

Heather Browning (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Mon, 2016-10-03 12:58
Philsoc seminar Date and time:  Tue, 06/12/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Dana Goswick (University of Melbourne): A Devitt-Proof Constructivism

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2016-09-30 21:32
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Thu, 20/10/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

I distinguish 20th century Constructivists (e.g. Goodman, Putnam) whose anti-Realism is global and is motivated by epistemic and semantic concerns about Realism from 21st century Constructivists (e.g.

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Christian Complexions in Seventeenth-Century England

School of History - events - Thu, 2016-09-29 10:37
Date and time:  Wed, 05/10/2016 - 16:15 - 17:30 Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU

E. Pagitt, Heresiography (1662 edition), p.244.

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Categories: Events, School of History

General Leonard Wood and the Politics of Empire, War and Peace in the United States

School of History - events - Tue, 2016-09-27 15:10
Date and time:  Wed, 28/09/2016 - 16:15 - 17:30 Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU

Leonard Wood won fame at the sharp end of the American Empire – first with Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba during the Spanish American War and then in the Philippines as Governor of  Moro Province, where he led the brutal suppression of an indigenous rebellion between 1903 and 1906. He then served as Army Chief of Staff between 1910 and 1914, and then argued for American military preparedness as World War I engulfed the rest of the western world. Along the way Wood grew ever closer to the Republican Party, to Roosevelt,  and alienated the Democratic Wilson administration.

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Categories: Events, School of History

Parents’ work conditions and children’s outcomes in Australia: Does family context matter?

Demography - events - Tue, 2016-09-27 14:25
Date and time:  Fri, 14th Oct 2016 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm Presenter:  Meg Kingsley Location:  Seminar Room A, Coombs Building #9

In Australia, there are socio-demographic differences in children’s outcomes. Evidence suggests that these differences can extend into adulthood. Work and family structures are important environmental influences on children’s development, which may contribute to inequality. However, it is not well understood how the impact of parental work arrangements on children varies between different families. This project seeks to understand how the work‑family interface differs between families with different socio‑demographic characteristics.

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Colin Klein (Macquarie): Cognitive ontology: living with less than unification

Philosophy - events - Sun, 2016-09-25 17:53
Thursday Seminar Date and time:  Tue, 11/10/2016 - 16:00 - 18:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Many prominent cognitive neuroscientists argue that the present categories of cognitive science are badly misguided, and that neuroscientific work will radically revise our 'cognitive ontology.' Implicit in these debates is the assumption that cognitive science must aim at unification, in part because cognitive models of different domains must ultimately interact with one another. That can be denied, and has been denied by a number of so-called contextualists, including (apparently) me.

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A Third Perspective between Colonialism and Nationalism: Inter-Colonial Health Governing Schemes of the League of Nations’ Far Eastern Rural Hygiene Conference, Bandung 1937

School of History - events - Mon, 2016-09-19 11:31
Date and time:  Wed, 21/09/2016 - 16:15 - 17:30 Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU

Shortly after the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War, the League of Nations held the Far Eastern Rural Hygiene Conference in Bandung, which was hosted by the Dutch East Indies government, between 3–13 August 1937. The conference of 1937 has long been overshadowed by the other Bandung Conference of 1955, which launched the third force of non-alliance in the bipolar Cold War politics, led by post-colonial leaders in Asia.

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Categories: Events, School of History

The national key performance indicators for Indigenous primary health organisations

CAEPR events - Fri, 2016-09-16 18:09
28 Sep 16 Dr Indrani Pieris-Caldwell

Since 2011, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has been collecting individual service level data from Indigenous primary health care organisations against a set of national key performance indicators. These indicators look at both the organisational processes and health outcomes in the areas of maternal and child health; preventative health and chronic disease management. The AIHW works with services to improve their data quality and return the data back to services to inform their own continuous quality improvement activities.

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

Gendered Innovations in the Social Sciences Conference

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2016-09-16 16:41
Workshop / conference Date and time:  Mon, 07/11/2016 (All day) - Wed, 09/11/2016 (All day) Location:  Lecture Theatre 1, Hedley Bull Building (130), Australian National University

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Fertility decline and shift in childbearing preferences among Bhutanese women

Demography - events - Wed, 2016-09-14 13:36
Date and time:  Fri, 28th Oct 2016 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm Presenter:  Tshering Jamtsho Location:  Seminar Room A, Coombs Building #9

Bhutan is witnessing a wave of drastic fertility decline in recent decades. Its total fertility rate (TFR) currently sits at 2.3 children per woman. Bhutan’s TFR declined from a high of 5.6 in 1994 to a near replacement fertility level of 2.3 in 2012. Since fertility is considered one of the principal determinants of population growth, its changes mainly affect the age-structure, size and distribution of any population. The median age of population in Bhutan stands at 24 years, demonstrating a young population structure.

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Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship: A Co-generated Approach

CAEPR events - Wed, 2016-09-14 11:45
05 Oct 16 Professor Bob Anderson

Around the world the urgency, strength and legitimacy of Indigenous people's concerns, aspirations and values are increasing as Indigenous people exert their rights and treaties in the judicial courts, the political arena and the court of public opinion. As a result of land loss and severe control and limitations set by the various levels of government on the free use of and continuing benefit from their natural resources, Indigenous people have become increasingly dependent on welfare measures (United Nations, 2009: 24-25).

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

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