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Events

Climbing the career ladder: The links between personality and promotion

RSSS - events - Wed, 2017-05-31 14:51
Date and time:  Wednesday, 14th June 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm Location or Venue:  Jean Martin Room Level 3 Beryl Rawson Building (Building 13) ANU Presenter:  Dr Leonora Risse (School of Economics, Finance and Marketing; RMIT University) Contact Person:  CSRM Contact email:  csrm.comms@anu.edu.au

This talk explores the ways in which personality traits – especially an individual’s sense of confidence – can determine job promotion outcomes. The model posits that confidence influences the likelihood that an individual will put themselves forward for promotion by shaping the individual's own evaluation of their marginal productivity relative to the job requirements. The crux of this model is that this self-evaluation measure is distinct from an individual's actual marginal productivity, as evaluated by the firm.

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Measuring social attitudes with Voter Advice Application data

RSSS - events - Wed, 2017-05-31 14:48
Date and time:  Wednesday, 7th June 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm Location or Venue:  Jean Martin Room Level 3 Beryl Rawson Building (Building 13) ANU Presenter:  Dr Jill Sheppard, ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods & School of Politics and International Relations Contact Person:  CSRM Contact email:  csrm.comms@anu.edu.au

This study directly compares survey data on social attitudes collected from an opt-in sample of Voter Advice Application (VAA) users and a randomly recruited, probability-based online panel of respondents. While much research to date has focused on the demographic representativeness of VAA data, less is known about the attitudinal and other representativeness of that data. This study of Australian samples contributes to the emerging literature.

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The comparative wellbeing of the New Zealand Māori and Indigenous Australian

RSSS - events - Wed, 2017-05-31 09:03
Date and time:  Wednesday, 31st May 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm Presenter:  Professor Matthew Gray Contact Person:  CSRM Contact email:  csrm.comms@anu.edu.au

Some researchers have argued that strong periods of economic growth and economic downturns have a greater impact on the economic position of the Indigenous population than the non-Indigenous population in settler societies such as Australia and New Zealand. The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-08 negatively affected economic growth New Zealand in the two years after 2009 whereas the Australian economy experienced a reduction in economic growth but did not enter recession.

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RSSS Public Lecture Series: Adverse Events - On bad affects and the antidepressant wars

RSSS - events - Mon, 2017-05-29 12:39
Date and time:  Monday, 5th June 2017 - 5:00pm 1280px-Prozac_pills.jpg Location or Venue:  SRWB Theatrette, Sir Roland Wilson Building (Building 120), ANU Presenter:  Professor Elizabeth Wilson Contact email:  eo.rsss@anu.edu.au

In this lecture Professor Wilson will address the issue of psychopharmaceuticals, harm and adverse effects. The lecture will begin by considering the arguments against anti-depressant medications developed by a loose alliance of critics (feminists, anti-psychiatry activists, clinicians) who maintain that these medications pose a significant threat to the patients who take them: are adolescents, in particular, more susceptible to suicidal ideation when they take antidepressants?

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James Owen Weatherall (UCI)

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 09:19
Date and time:  Tue, 29/08/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Melissa Fusco (Columbia)

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 09:15
Date and time:  Tue, 22/08/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Cailin O'Connor (UCI)

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 09:12
Date and time:  Tue, 15/08/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Amy Kind (CMC)

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 09:07
Date and time:  Tue, 08/08/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Carolina Sartorio (Arizona): More of a Cause?

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 08:40
Date and time:  Tue, 18/07/2017 - 16:00 - 18:00 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

"The driver’s speeding was more of a cause of the accident than the bad state of the roads.” Claims like this, which are quite common in ordinary discourse, presuppose that causal contributions come in degrees. Some accounts of moral responsibility and liability rely on a graded notion of causation in that they ground degrees of responsibility or liability on degrees of causal contribution. So a lot seems to hang on whether we can make sense of degrees of causal contribution. In this paper I argue that there is good reason to be skeptical.

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David Chalmers (NYU & ANU): The Externalist and the Structuralist Responses to Skepticism

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 08:34
Date and time:  Tue, 11/07/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  SRWB Theatrette (Room 2.02)

I will discuss two ways of responding to Cartesian arguments for global skepticism about the external world.  In an earlier paper ("The Matrix as Metaphysics") I argued that Cartesian hypotheses such as the evil demon hypothesis, the brain-in-a-vat hypothesis, and the Matrix hypothesis are not in fact skeptical hypotheses: if these hypotheses are correct, most of our ordinary beliefs are still true.  This response is often assimilated to Hilary Putnam's appeal to semantic externalism to defuse external-world skepticism, whereby brains in vats are held to refer to wha

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Janice Dowell (Syracuse)

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 08:30
Date and time:  Tue, 06/06/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Una Stojnic (NYU & ANU) Semantics and What is Said

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 08:27
Date and time:  Tue, 20/06/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

A commonplace view is that only a semantic theory that interprets sentences of a language according to what their utterances intuitively say can be correct. The rationale is that only by requiring a tight connection between what a sentence means and what its users intuitively say can we explain why, normally, those linguistically competent with a language upon hearing its sentences uttered can discern what they say. More precisely, this approach ties the semantic content of a sentence to intuitions about “says that” reports.

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Alex Sandgren (ANU): In Defence of Idiosyncrasy

Philosophy - events - Fri, 2017-05-26 08:25
Date and time:  Tue, 13/06/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Descriptivist theories of belief content (for example those of Quine, Lewis, Braddon-Mitchell, and Jackson) imply that ordinary agents do not often have beliefs with the same content. Common complaints made against descriptivism concern communication, agreement, disagreement, and the norms of belief change. The natural explanation of these phenomena, the complaints run, requires that agents often have beliefs with the same content, so accepting descriptivism compromises our ability to correctly explain these phenomena.

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'History and the Present' David Armitage Workshop - Allan Martin

School of History - events - Wed, 2017-05-24 11:05
Date and time:  Wed, 31/05/2017 - 16:15 - 17:30 School of History Photo 2.jpg Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU Contact Person:  School of History Contact email:  hist.admin.cass@anu.edu.au https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/history-and-the-present-workshop-allan-martin-tickets-34815957466

Historians have traditionally had three ethical responsibilities--to the past, the present and the future. Since the nineteenth century, professional historians have increasingly abandoned their duty to the future, focused their attention on the distance and strangeness of the past and shunned contemporary concerns to avoid the sin of anachronism or, even worse, "presentism".

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Categories: Events, School of History

Raphael Lemkin in the Outback: The state project to eliminate homeland living in remote Indigenous Australia

CAEPR events - Thu, 2017-05-18 16:44
14 Jun 17 Seminar Jon Altman Contact person:  Tracy Deasey Contact email:  caepradmin.cass@anu.edu.au Contact phone:  02 61250587

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

The Crowd in the Thatcher Revolution: Margaret Thatcher’s rise to the conservative party leadership & aspects of her popular support

School of History - events - Thu, 2017-05-18 13:58
Date and time:  Wed, 24/05/2017 - 16:15 - 17:30 School of History 24May_Image1.jpg Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU Speakers:  Dr Chris Wallace Contact Person:  School of History Contact email:  hist.admin.cass@anu.edu.au

The Thatcher Government appears as a political behemoth to contemporary observers looking back on a period of policy and social change still reverberating through western democracies. ‘Thatcherism’ became a synonym for the neoliberal suite of policies in which market forces are paramount, and for which her government 1979-90 led the charge - an approach initially contested but now a largely internalised engine driving public policy discourse and development in the west over the past 40 years.

Image gallery 24May_Image2.jpg

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Categories: Events, School of History

Australian immigration policy at the crossroads

Demography - events - Thu, 2017-05-11 15:52
Date and time:  Fri, 2nd Jun 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm School of Demography Location:  Seminar Room A Presenter:  Peter Hughes

Australian immigration policy is at the crossroads. Our permanent and temporary migration programs are at record levels, but border protection and maritime asylum seekers have dominated public debate for over a decade. Many of the fundamental principles that have guided our policies for the last 70 years are looking more fragile. Mass movements of people in the Middle East and Africa have led to more restrictive northern hemisphere immigration policies. The UN is working on development of Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees to broker more positive approaches.

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Lessons from the evaluation of past local area population forecasts

Demography - events - Sun, 2017-05-07 19:43
Date and time:  Fri, 9th Jun 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm School of Demography Location:  Seminar Room A Presenter:  Tom Wilson

Abstract

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Non-Parametric Spatial Bayesian Crime Regression

RSSS - events - Fri, 2017-05-05 12:44
Date and time:  Wednesday, 24th May 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm Location or Venue:  Street Theatre, Street Three, 15 Childers Street, Canberra, 2601 Presenter:  Dr Roman Marchant Contact Person:  CSRM Contact email:  csrm.comms@anu.edu.au

Two significant methodological challenges confront policy makers and practitioners in using crime data. The first challenge is that the models underestimate the extent of crimes occurring within a geographical space and the second is that the models need fully reflect uncertainties in prediction and inference. Combining machine learning techniques and new Bayesian estimation tools this paper develops a generic modelling strategy that learns and hence models crime in a spatial environment. This model will enable policy makers and police to make better and more informed decisions.

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Jakob Hohwy (Monash) The predictive mind and embodied cognition

Philosophy - events - Thu, 2017-05-04 16:11
Date and time:  Thu, 01/06/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Seminar Thursday Seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Abstract: The prediction error minimization framework for explaining mind and cognition is becoming increasingly influential. Some believe it is the perfect partner for notions of embodied cognition, some believe that it is not. I explain the framework's core aspects and chart their consequences for embodied cognition. Some but not all aspects of the framework are anathema to embodied cognition. The predictive mind seems to be beyond the standard representationalism-embodied cognition divide.

Updated: 28 July 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSSS / Page Contact:  Web Publisher