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Events

How the Personal Became Political: Re-Assessing Australia’s Revolutions in Gender and Sexuality in the 1970s

School of History - events - Mon, 2017-02-20 08:54
Date and time:  Mon, 06/03/2017 - 09:00 - Tue, 07/03/2017 - 17:30 Venue:  Auditorium and Seminar Rm, China in the World

This interdisciplinary 2-day symposium is the ANU Gender Institute Signature Event for 2017 and will celebrate both International Women’s Day and the Institute’s 6th anniversary. See below for full program.

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Categories: Events, School of History

‘Now is the Psychological Moment’— Earle Page and the Imagining of Australia

School of History - events - Fri, 2017-02-17 08:07
Date and time:  Wed, 22/02/2017 - 16:15 - 17:30 Venue:  McDonald Room, Menzies Library, ANU

Stephen Wilks will present his thesis on the remarkable but little-studied Earle Christmas Grafton Page (1880-1961) – Country Party leader, Treasurer, Prime Minister and perhaps the most extraordinary visionary to hold high public office in the Australian Commonwealth.

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Categories: Events, School of History

Marriage squeeze of minority populations in Yunnan

Demography - events - Mon, 2017-02-06 11:05
Date and time:  Fri, 24th Feb 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm Presenter:  Professor Jun Yang Location:  Jean Martin Room, Beryl Rawson Building (#13)

Long-term inequalities in male to female sex ratios have led to a surplus of men and subsequent marriage market imbalances in China. This has been further complicated by the practice of brides marrying upward in social class, which has disproportionally affected lowest-class men in rural areas. The patterns of marriage squeeze are analyzed using data from field research conducted on minorities in several villages in Yunan Province.

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Regional Security in a Turbulent World: A GCC Perspective

CAIS - events - Mon, 2017-02-06 10:55
Date and time:  Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 17:30 - 18:30 Lecture Centre for Arab & Islamic Studies Location or Venue:  The Great Hall, University House, Liversidge St, ANU Speaker:  HE Dr Mohammad Al-Sabah Contact Person:  CAIS Contact email:  cais@anu.edu.au https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/regional-security-in-a-turbulent-world-a-gcc-perspective-tickets-31860774434

Over the past decade, the nature of the challenges and threats affecting the Middle East region have been among the most complex it has ever faced. The region’s political order is in a state of fundamental disequilibrium: from the unravelling of the Sykes-Picot architecture to the emergence of a nuclear Iran, and the unprecedented challenges to the legitimacy of the Arab political system. Each of these challenges is a potential threat to global peace and stability.

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Luke Roelofs (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Sat, 2017-02-04 20:05
Philsoc seminar Date and time:  Tue, 14/03/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Sarah Sorial (UOW)

Philosophy - events - Thu, 2017-02-02 22:16
MSPT seminar Date and time:  Mon, 13/02/2017 - 12:30 - 14:00 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Indigenous Peoples’ Climate Justice Movements

CAEPR events - Tue, 2017-01-24 15:42
24 Feb 17 Dr Kyle Whyte (Potawatomi) Timnick Chair in Humanities Michigan State University

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s effort to block the Dakota Access Pipeline is among the most recent Indigenous-led movements connected to climate justice. This presentation seeks to provide an overview of the many different Indigenous-led efforts to achieve climate justice.

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Categories: CAEPR, Events

Susan Pennings (ANU): Responsibility-sensitive health care and the Abandonment Objection (TPR)

Philosophy - events - Mon, 2017-01-23 12:01
Philsoc seminar Date and time:  Tue, 07/03/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Many luck egalitarians argue that social institutions should prioritise neutralising the disadvantages people face which are a result of unchosen social or natural causes, over disadvantages caused by individuals' own reasonably avoidable choices. One of the main objections to luck egalitarianism is known as the Abandonment Objection, which argues that luck egalitarianism is implausibly harsh towards people suffering as the result of their own choices.

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Vince Redhouse (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Mon, 2017-01-23 11:28
Date and time:  Tue, 06/06/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

TBA

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 13:51
Date and time:  Tue, 16/05/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Alex Sandgren (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:29
Date and time:  Tue, 30/05/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Daniel Stoljar (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:28
Date and time:  Tue, 23/05/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

TBA

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:27
Date and time:  Tue, 09/05/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar College of Arts & Social Sciences Research School of Social Sciences School of Philosophy Centre for Consciousness Centre for Moral, Social and Political Theory Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Daniel Kilov (ANU): TPR

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:26
Date and time:  Tue, 02/05/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Lachlan Umbers (ANU)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:25
Date and time:  Tue, 18/04/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Heather Browning (ANU): Validating scientific indicators – a robustness approach

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:24
Date and time:  Tue, 11/04/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Much of science involves measurement of objects or states of the world. Often instead of direct measurement, scientists employ the use of indicators, or surrogate measures, changes in which are assumed to reflect changes in the target state. This leads to the problem of validation – ensuring that the indicators are actually measuring what they are intended for. Validation is a particular concern in cases where the target state is ‘hidden’ and cannot itself be measured for comparison.

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Lachlan Walmsley (ANU): How climate simulations earn their credentials

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:23
Date and time:  Tue, 04/04/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Climate models are complicated things. Their construction often begins with off-the-shelf physical equations, but these equations are always approximated, and typically the approximation is rough. For us to trust a climate model and its results, it must earn its credentials. There are at least two ways in which a model can earn these credentials: fit with the data and theoretical pedigree. For Eric Winsberg, although fit is preferred, we may need to rely on pedigree when data is scarce.

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Kirsten Mann (ANU): Aggregation cases and the large numbers objection (TPR)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:22
Date and time:  Tue, 28/03/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Can a very large number of instances of low (but positive) value outweigh a small number of instances of very high value? When faced with thought experiments like the Repugnant Conclusion and Life for Headaches, many of us have the strong intuition that they cannot: no number of headaches cured can outweigh the value of a life; no number of lives just above the neutral level can outweigh the value of a smaller number of flourishing lives.

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James Willoughby (ANU): …are doomed to repeat it (TPR)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:21
Date and time:  Tue, 21/03/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Philsoc seminar School of Philosophy Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

This talk is a TPR. It will contain an overview of my thesis and a paper. The question that I will answer in my thesis is: how confident should you be in your own philosophical theories? To answer this question I will be looking at some large sources of evidence that might undermine our confidence in our philosophical methods. These bodies of evidence are: widespread disagreement, experimental results from X-phil, and the history of philosophy. I will also develop an account of how to incorporate the particular type of evidence you get from these sources.

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Devon Cass (ANU): Social Egalitarianism Characterized (TPR)

Philosophy - events - Wed, 2017-01-18 09:19
Philsoc seminar Date and time:  Tue, 28/02/2017 - 15:30 - 17:30 Location:  Coombs Seminar Room A

Social egalitarians argue that equality should be understood in ‘social’ or ‘relational’ terms. They claim the most deeply objectionable forms of inequality involve social hierarchy, as exemplified by slavery, patriarchy, and other pernicious divisions of class or caste. The goal of egalitarianism is to replace hierarchy with relations of equality. Social egalitarians worry that contemporary political philosophy has lost sight of this goal.

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