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The Australian National University

Criminology Research

 

 

no photo availableExploring the causes and consequences of the Australian crime decline: a comparative analysis of the criminal trajectories of two NSW birth cohorts

Jason Payne, Rick Brown and Roderic Broadhurst
Funded by the Criminology Research Council (CRC)

Using the Semi-Parametric Group Based Trajectory method, this study will conduct a comparative analysis of the emerging criminal trajectories of two NSW birth cohorts (1984 and 1994). These specific cohorts have been selected to represent two developmentally and contextually distinct periods. Born in 1984, the first cohort are members of Generation Y. They are a cohort of young people who transitioned through adolescence at a time of year-on-year growth in the incidence of drug, property and violent crimes in NSW. The second cohort are members of Generation Z who, unlike their predecessors, transitioned through adolescence at a time when heroin was scarce, when crime rates were falling, and when both federal and state government investment in early intervention and diversion schemes was in rapid expansion. The purpose of this study is to identify whether, in these vastly different contexts, there has been a fundamental shift in the size (proportion of population), shape (age of onset, speed of escalation) and nature (offence types, signal crimes, specialisation) of the early antisocial and criminal trajectories of young people in NSW.

 

 

no photo availableBuilding effective interventions for drug users in the criminal justice system - a review of drug courts and other interventions

Jason Payne, Anthony Morgan and Toni Makkai
Funded by the Queensland Department of Justice and Attorney General (DJAG)

The Drug and Specialist Courts Review was commissioned to develop options for the reinstatement of a drug court in Queensland and the development of an overarching framework for Queensland’s specialist courts and court programs. The Review was initiated in response to the Queensland Palaszczuk Government’s election commitment to reinstate specialist courts and diversionary programs defunded under the former LNP Government. The Review is aimed at ensuring options for the reinstated Drug Court are evidence-based, cost-effective and reflect modern best-practice in relation to drug-related offending. The Review has also considered how the current suite of court programs might be improved to enhance their operation.

 

 

no photo availableEstimating the Cost of Policing Alcohol in Victoria

Matthew Manning, Gabriel Wong, Jason Payne, Toni Makkai, Christopher Fleming
Funded by the National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund (NDLERF)

Using the Semi-Parametric Group Based Trajectory method, this study will conduct a comparative analysis of the emerging criminal trajectories of two NSW birth cohorts (1984 and 1994). These specific cohorts have been selected to represent two developmentally and contextually distinct periods. Born in 1984, the first cohort are members of Generation Y. They are a cohort of young people who transitioned through adolescence at a time of year-on-year growth in the incidence of drug, property and violent crimes in NSW. The second cohort are members of Generation Z who, unlike their predecessors, transitioned through adolescence at a time when heroin was scarce, when crime rates were falling, and when both federal and state government investment in early intervention and diversion schemes was in rapid expansion. The purpose of this study is to identify whether, in these vastly different contexts, there has been a fundamental shift in the size (proportion of population), shape (age of onset, speed of escalation) and nature (offence types, signal crimes, specialisation) of the early antisocial and criminal trajectories of young people in NSW.

 

 

Updated: 9 June 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSSS / Page Contact:  Web Publisher